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Biography Of The Author – Muhammad Ibn Abdul Wahaab

Posted in Kitaab At-Tawheed Classes with tags , , , , , , , on November 25, 2009 by TheAuthenticBase

Biography Of The Author – Muhammad Ibn Abdul Wahaab

Sheikh-ul-Islam
Muhammad bin Abdul-Wahhab
A renowned Reviver and a great Reformer

His Birth and Lineage
Sheikh-ul-Islam, Muhammad bin Abdul-Wahhab, was born in 1115 H. in the city of Uyainah, seventy kilometers northwest of Riyadh, the capital of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. He belonged to a highly respectable and scholarly family; his father Sheikh Abdul-Wahhab bin Sulaiman, characterized by his profound scholarship and righteousness, inherited an exalted status from his ancestor Sheikh Sulaiman bin Ali, the chief of the scholars and well versed in teaching, writing and giving verdict.

Education
Sheikh-ul-Islam acquired his primary education from his esteemed father at his native place and was nurtured under his guidance. He was intelligent enough to memorize the Qur’an by heart at the very tender age of ten only. He read the books on Tafseer (exegesis), Hadith and Fiqh. From the very outset, he was greatly interested in studying the works of early scholars, particularly those of Sheikh-ul-Islam Ibn Taimiyah and his noble disciple Allamah Ibn Qaiyim. He went through all those books and well grasped the contents.

On attaining the age of maturity, he set out to perform Hajj at Makkah and derived benefits from the scholars there. He then proceeded to Al-Madinah, met the learned ones there, and adopted the studentship of two renowned erudite, Sheikh Abdullah bin Ibrahim bin Sa’id Najdi and Sheikh Muhammad Hayat Sindhi for a long period. Out of the curiosity for higher education, he took also the journey to Iraq and Basrah and got himself benefited there.

Condition of Najd
In those days, the people of Najd were badly indulged in polytheistic deeds and un-Islamic practices. They were completely overwhelmed with polytheism. The graves, trees, stones, caves, evil spirits and insane persons were regarded as deities. The baseless stories and tales were ascribed to them to manifest their excellence. The worldly Ulama too had misguided them for the fulfillment of their materialistic lust. The soothsayers and magicians were having their influence over the society.

None could dare challenge their holds on the commoners. Same condition was prevailing in both Makkah and Al-Madinah also. Yemen was also in the same line. Polytheism, erection of structures on the graves, seeking refuge and assistance of the dead, saints and jinns were the common religious features.

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